Why creationism is wrong and evolution is right

 

Steve Jones

Professor Steve Jones
University College London

 
Science is about disbelief. It accepts that all knowledge is provisional and that any theory might in principle be disproved. Some theories are better established than others: the earth is probably not flat, babies are almost certainly not brought by storks, and men and dinosaurs are unlikely to have appeared on earth within the past few thousand years.  Even so, nothing is sacred in 1905 classical physics collapsed after a seemingly trivial observation about glowing gases and the same is potentially true for all other scientific theories.
 
Many biologists are worried by a recent and unexpected return of an argument based on belief by the certainty, untestable and unsupported by evidence, that life did not evolve but appeared by supernatural means. Worldwide, more people believe in creationism than in evolution. Why do no biologists agree? Steve Jones will talk about what evolution is, about new evidence that men and chimps are close relatives and about how we are, nevertheless, unique and why creationism does more harm to religion than it does to science.  

Steve Jones won the Aventis Prize for Science Books (then known as the Rhone-Poulenc Prize) in 1994 for 'The Language of the Genes'. In 1997 he was awarded the Royal Society's Michael Faraday Prize - the UK's foremost award for communicating science to the public.

The General Prize shortlist for the Royal Society's Aventis Prizes for Science Books 2006 was announced at this event.

 

Why creationism is wrong and evolution is right 6-9 Carlton House Terrace London SW1Y 5AG UK

Events coming up

  • Science Showoff 30 June 2015 at The Royal Society, London Join us for a weird and wonderful night of science comedy, music and performance.
  • Summer Science Exhibition 2015 30 June 2015 at The Royal Society, London Our annual Summer Science Exhibition showcases the most exciting cutting-edge science and technology research. Come and try your hand at the science experiments that are changing our world.
  • How maths and logic gave us monitors 30 June 2015 at The Royal Society, London Discover why, 200 years on, the birth of George Boole in 1815 was critical for the development of the digital computer.

For more events please see the events diary.

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