Everest, the first ascent: the untold story of the man who made it possible

Griffith Pugh conducting high-altitude physiological experiments. © Royal Geographical Society.

Public history of science lecture by Harriet Tuckey
 

Event details

 
The conquest of Everest by a British team in 1953 has always been celebrated as a triumph of heroic leadership, team work and courageous climbing, but the vital role that scientific innovation played in the success of the expedition has never been widely acknowledged. 
Now, sixty years after the event, Harriet Tuckey tells the story of her father Dr Griffith Pugh, a physiologist and expert on extreme conditions, who made the first ascent possible by solving the key physiological problems of climbing at very high altitudes. In 1952, funded by the Royal Society, Griffith Pugh carried out pioneering physiological research on Cho Oyu, a mountain on the Nepal-Tibet border. On his return he devised a blueprint for success in 1953 – covering acclimatisation, diet and hydration and crucially the policy for the use of oxygen. In addition he designed or modified much of the clothing and protective equipment used on the expedition.
 

Attending this event

 
This event is free to attend and open to all. No tickets are required. Doors open at 12.30pm and seats will be allocated on a first-come-first-served basis.
 
We have a limited number of spaces for wheelchair users and ten bookable seats for people with impaired mobility who are unable to queue. To book in advance, please contact the events team. Further information about accessibility is available.
 
Recorded audio will be available on this page a few days after the event.
 
Enquiries: Contact the events team

 

Everest, the first ascent: the untold story of the man who made it possible 6-9 Carlton House Terrace London SW1Y 5AG UK

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