Genetics, epigenetics and disease

Royal Society GlaxoSmithKline Prize Lecture given by Professor Adrian Bird CBE FMedSci FRS
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Event details

 
Adrian Bird CBE FMedSci FRS is the Buchanan Chair of Genetics at the University of Edinburgh.
 
The human genome sequence has been available for more than a decade, but its significance is still not fully understood. While most human genes have been identified, there is much to learn about the DNA signals that control them. This lecture described an unusually short DNA sequence, just two base pairs long, CG, which occurs in several chemically different forms. Defects in signalling by CG are implicated in disease. For example, the autism spectrum disorder Rett syndrome is caused by loss of a protein that reads methylated CG and affects the activity of genes.
 
The Royal Society GlaxoSmithKline Prize Lecture is awarded for original contributions to medical and veterinary sciences published within ten years from the date of the award.
 
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Genetics, epigenetics and disease 6-9 Carlton House Terrace London SW1Y 5AG UK

Events coming up

  • Bioinspiration of new technologies 27 May 2015 at The Royal Society, London Scientific discussion meeting organised by Professor Denis Noble CBE FRS, Professor Clemens Kaminski and Professor Richard Templer
  • The next big thing 29 May 2015 at Hay Festival, Hay-on-Wye, Wales Four Royal Society Research Fellows discuss their work at the forefront of science at the Hay Festival.
  • Stuff matters 31 May 2015 at Hay Festival, Hay-on-Wye, Wales Join award winning author Mark Miodownik at the Hay Festival.

For more events please see the events diary.

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