The asymmetric Universe

Michael Faraday Prize and Lecture by Professor Frank Close OBE, University of Oxford

Event details

Modern scientific theory describes a perfectly symmetrical Universe. A Universe in which matter is destroyed within an instant of its appearance and where nothing we now know could ever have happened. Human life itself seems to be lopsided, as the spherical embryo is transformed into a highly structured being with its internal organs mirrored asymmetrically. This talk explores the profound role of asymmetry in nature, and the role of its agent - the Higgs Boson - in creating a Universe fit for life.

The Royal Society Michael Faraday Prize is awarded annually to the scientist or engineer whose expertise in communicating scientific ideas in lay terms is exemplary. Professor Frank Close OBE was presented the award for his excellence in science communication.

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The asymmetric Universe 6-9 Carlton House Terrace London SW1Y 5AG UK

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