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Awards

Clifford Paterson Medal and Lecture

Awarded for any aspect of engineering. It is aimed at scientists working in modern and popular fields such as new media technologies and consumer electronics.

Clifford Paterson FRS

Professor Russell Cowburn FRSProfessor Russell Cowburn FRS


Professor Russell Cowburn FRS was awarded the 2016 Clifford Paterson Medal and Lecture for his remarkable academic, technical and commercial achievements in nano-magnetics.   

Magnetism is a very old subject and sometimes people think there’s little left to discover.  All of that changes when nanotechnology and magnetism are brought together – without the technologies that have come out of that meeting we wouldn’t have social media, the Cloud or probably even the Internet.  It’s hard to think of a more rapidly changing and exciting area of physics and technology.  I’m delighted that my contribution in this area has been recognised by the Royal Society and wish to thank my research group in Cambridge for all of their hard work.




Professor Polina Bayvel FREng was awarded the 2014 Clifford Paterson Lecture for her fundamental research in high bandwidth digital communications and nonlinear optics.

Molly Stevens delivered the prize lecture in 2012 on ‘Regenerating organs and other small challenges’.

See full list of all past winners of the Clifford Paterson Medal and Lecture .

The award

The lectureship was originally endowed by The General Electric Company in memory of Clifford Paterson FRS, who founded the GEC Research Laboratories in 1919. Originally the lectures were given on electrical science and technology but this was later broadened to any aspect of engineering. The first lecture was given in 1975. The lectureship is accompanied by a medal and a gift of £2,000.

The Clifford Paterson Medal and Lecture is given biennially (in odd years) on any aspect of engineering. It is aimed at scientists working in modern and popular fields such as new media technologies and consumer electronics.

Nominations

The call for nominations is now closed. The next call for nominations will open in November 2016.

The recipient is chosen by the Council of the Royal Society on the recommendation of the Physical Sciences Awards Committee. The committee will consider the nomination a maximum of 3 times, before the nomination is retired. Re-nomination is possible after 1 round has passed.

The award is open to citizens of a Commonwealth country or of the Irish Republic or those who have been ordinarily resident and working in a Commonwealth country or in the Irish Republic for a minimum of three years immediately prior to being proposed.