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Primary projects

The case studies below are a selection of primary projects that have been funded through the Partnership Grants scheme. You can find more primary case studies focusing on climate and biodiversity issues featured on our Tomorrow’s climate scientists case studies page. If you have any questions about the projects below, please get in touch

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Does plant diversity affect the behaviour of honeybees?
The Olympic GB luge team need a luge starting ramp! Can pupils across Renfrewshire create the near perfect design?
How much can we reduce our school’s use of fossil fuels by generating renewable energy on site?
Building a symbiotic city: can we design and build a sustainable city fit for the future?
Why did the stickleback lose its spines?
Can you build a rover fit for Mars?
A-MAZE-ing robots: how do future self-drive cars work?

Does plant diversity affect the behaviour of honeybees?

Students across several years at Saxton Primary School are investigating bee biodiversity and conservation, using the book ‘The Most Important Animal of All’ as inspiration. With their STEM partner from the University of Leeds the school will be buying a beehive and suitable plants to see how bee behaviour and the biodiversity of flowering plans may be linked. This is part of a collaborative project.

To find out more about their project read this summary (PDF).

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The Olympic GB luge team need a luge starting ramp! Can pupils across Renfrewshire create the near perfect design?

Students from Todholm Primary School, along with Bargarran Primary, Brediland Primary, St James Primary, Langcraigs Primary School and Cochrane Castle Primary School are collaborating with the Royal Navy and Glasgow Caledonian University to design the United Kingdom's first artificial luge track to enable UK athletes to enhance their competitive edge. The students will learn about materials and use a 3D printer to trial model ramps. This is part of a collaborative project.

To find out more about their project read this summary (PDF) or read a blog article written by the Lead teacher sharing how the project developed. You can also read this local news article.

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How much can we reduce our school’s use of fossil fuels by generating renewable energy on site? 

Modbury Primary School students are investigating how much fossil fuel is used in their school and what the resulting carbon dioxide emissions are. With their STEM partner at University of Exeter they will then look at what alternative energy sources, such as wind and solar power, they could use on-site to reduce the use of fossil fuels.

To find out more about their project read this summary (PDF) or read this local news article.

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Building a symbiotic city: can we design and build a sustainable city fit for the future?

In this project students aged 10-11 from Craigentinny Primary School will be investigating the ways that they can live more sustainably by designing and building cities taking into consideration pollution, biodiversity, travel and building infrastructure. The students, with the STEM partner Sweco, will explore the world of civil engineering to widen their understanding of the myriad of opportunities available for our futures. 

To find out more about their project read this summary (PDF).

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Why did the stickleback lose its spines?

“Many populations of three-spined sticklebacks on the Outer Hebridean island of North Uist are almost unique in having evolved the complete loss of their bony protective armour, comprising spines and plates. Other populations possess a full complement of spines and plates, and yet others show varying levels of armour reduction. The goal will be to understand the reasons for the evolution of armour loss in North Uist sticklebacks.”

Find out more about the project (PDF).

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Can you build a rover fit for Mars?

“Students across four primary schools will participate in this exciting and investigative STEM project in partnership with their own individual STEM Ambassador, but there will also be an overall ambassador for the project. Within each school, primary-age children will work in small teams to design and test a Mars Rover. Teams will be chosen from the schools to attend an event at a suitable location. Here they will first work to solve the problem of a safe landing for their rover (an egg!) on Mars! After this, children will use a selection of materials and tools to create a rover for their team, to compete with other teams to cross a variety of replicated Martian terrain and collect a sample.”

Find out more about the project (PDF).

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A-MAZE-ing robots: how do future self-drive cars work?

“This is a school-wide project over an academic year with linked age-appropriate activities. It will culminate in an event where different stages of the project developed solely by one-year group are assembled to try to achieve the collective goal, which is to get the robot car from A to B autonomously. This is a self-sustaining project, which will run year on year. Pupils will build on the skills they have learnt from the previous year adopting a concept of teaching each other. This will be in the form of peer to-peer learning/teaching, but also pupils teaching teachers. This is essential to the sustainability of the project.”

Find out more about the project (PDF).

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