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Krzysztof Koziol

Dr Krzysztof Koziol

Dr Krzysztof Koziol

Research Fellow

Interests and expertise (Subject groups)

Grants awarded

High performance and lightweight carbon nanotube wires for power transmission

Scheme: University Research Fellowship

Organisation: University of Cambridge

Dates: Oct 2013-Sep 2016

Value: £292,572.22

Summary: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can offer high electrical conductivity and high currents density, both sought after for overhead power transmission where the axial strength of nanotubes would also be a bonus. A traditional metallic conductor such as copper changes in its resistance as the frequency of applied voltage is increased. This is known as skin effect, as the frequency increases, the current flow moves to the outside of a solid metal conductor and the cross-sectional area carrying current decreases, increasing resistance. In CNTs, the electron flow happens only on the walls, meaning that the resistance is not likely to change with frequency as is observed in conventional metallic conductors, which has massive industrial benefits. High level of structural control and macroscopic length of individual nanotubes allows the control of the properties of these materials on large scales. This project will continue to establish the ongoing strategies in the large scale molecular control of CNTs. However it will mainly focus on the remaining major issue related to the length control of individual nanotubes. The longer the nanotubes produced, the least resistance arising from the current moving from nanotube to nanotube junction. The project will address and explore the activity of the catalytic system used during the synthesis process and find strategies for extending the length of individual CNTs. CNT wires, with appropriate level of structural control, have the potential to become the new generation of electrical wires and cables. Those CNT wires can revolutionise the field of electrical conductors, energy generation and energy transportation due to the combination of benefits, including lightweight, high mechanical and electrical properties, and high corrosion resistance. The outcome of this research will have an unprecedented impact on the electrical and power transmission industries, while ultimately the benefits would accrue to society at large.

High performance carbon nanotube fibres for power transmission lines

Scheme: University Research Fellowship

Organisation: University of Cambridge

Dates: Oct 2008-Sep 2013

Value: £532,825.40

Summary: The title of my project is "High performance carbon nanotube fibres for power transmission lines". My research work is in the area of nanotechnology, exploration of the synthesis and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes and formation of high performance conducting wires. In this research project, single-wall carbon nanotubes (nanometer size tubes made of rolled up graphene sheets) with desirable chirality (that is, the way in which the carbon hexagonal rings are oriented along the nanotube axis) and dimensions are synthesized and spun into macroscopic fibres. These high performance carbon nanotube fibres are explored as light weight highly efficient materials for electrical wiring and general power transmission. Carbon nanotubes due to their unique molecular structure can offer high electrical conductivity and high currents density, both sought after especially for overhead transmission where the high axial strength of nanotubes would also be a bonus. The outcome of this research project will have an unprecedented impact on the future of power transmission, as well as electrical machines. It could save billions of pounds in terms of energy and make a significant contribution towards the reduction of global warming. There will be several fundamental benefits from the outcome of this research proposal. Demonstration of the chirality control of nanotubes, which is the “holy grail” in the field, would be important in itself, while its translation into useful wire and cable forms will make it much more immediately useful. The immediate beneficiaries will be the electrical and power transmission industries, while ultimately the benefits would accrue to society at large.

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