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Martin Dominik

Dr Martin Dominik

Dr Martin Dominik

Research Fellow

Interests and expertise (Subject groups)

Grants awarded

Exploring cool planet populations down to Lunar mass

Scheme: University Research Fellowship

Organisation: University of St Andrews

Dates: Oct 2014-Sep 2015

Value: £105,251.94

Summary: Dr Martin Dominik got fascinated about the gravitational bending of light and its astrophysical applications. For about a decade, the largest effort goes into exploiting this phenomenon for assessing the distribution of planets orbiting stars other than the Sun throughout the Milky Way. He is currently pushing the frontier towards detecting not only Earth-mass, but even Lunar-mass bodies through the development of new instruments and techniques that overcome the atmospheric blurring of the Earth's atmosphere in astronomical images, thereby giving ground-based telescopes a resolution power that otherwise is only achievable from space. Further interests range from real-time data management and user-optimal observation scheduling with robotic telescope networks to the clues to life on Earth from extra-terrestrial exploration. Martin is a strong advocate of communication being an essential part of science, and science being an integral part of society. He is moreover involved in building capacity in astronomy in the Middle East.

Planet population statistics from fully-deterministic microlensing campaigns

Scheme: University Research Fellowship

Organisation: University of St Andrews

Dates: Oct 2011-Sep 2014

Value: £306,632.61

Summary: Dr Martin Dominik got fascinated about the gravitational bending of light and its astrophysical applications. For about a decade, the largest effort goes into exploiting this phenomenon for assessing the distribution of planets orbiting stars other than the Sun throughout the Milky Way. He is currently pushing the frontier towards detecting not only Earth-mass, but even Lunar-mass bodies through the development of new instruments and techniques that overcome the atmospheric blurring of the Earth's atmosphere in astronomical images, thereby giving ground-based telescopes a resolution power that otherwise is only achievable from space. Further interests range from real-time data management and user-optimal observation scheduling with robotic telescope networks to the clues to life on Earth from extra-terrestrial exploration. Martin is a strong advocate of communication being an essential part of science, and science being an integral part of society. He is moreover involved in building capacity in astronomy in the Middle East.

Microlensing census of extra-solar planets around K- and M-dwarfs

Scheme: University Research Fellowship

Organisation: University of St Andrews

Dates: Oct 2006-Sep 2011

Value: £380,745.55

Summary: Dr Martin Dominik got fascinated about the gravitational bending of light and its astrophysical applications. For about a decade, the largest effort goes into exploiting this phenomenon for assessing the distribution of planets orbiting stars other than the Sun throughout the Milky Way. He is currently pushing the frontier towards detecting not only Earth-mass, but even Lunar-mass bodies through the development of new instruments and techniques that overcome the atmospheric blurring of the Earth's atmosphere in astronomical images, thereby giving ground-based telescopes a resolution power that otherwise is only achievable from space. Further interests range from real-time data management and user-optimal observation scheduling with robotic telescope networks to the clues to life on Earth from extra-terrestrial exploration. Martin is a strong advocate of communication being an essential part of science, and science being an integral part of society. He is moreover involved in building capacity in astronomy in the Middle East.

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