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Evolution of mechanisms and behaviour important for pain

Scientific meeting

Location

Kavli Royal Society Centre, Chicheley Hall, Newport Pagnell, Buckinghamshire, MK16 9JJ

Overview

Theo Murphy international scientific meeting organised by Dr Amanda Williams and Professor Edgar Terry Walters.

Image: layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the infralimbic prefrontal cortex of mice with neuropathic pain. Credit: Stephanie Shiers

This meeting will be the first to convene scientists from diverse fields studying mechanisms and behaviour important for pain together with experts in evolutionary medicine. The goals are to encourage the application of an evolutionary perspective to pain research, to identify pain-related questions having important evolutionary considerations, and to highlight advances in our understanding of the evolution of pain.

More information on the schedule of talks will be available soon. Recorded audio of the presentations will be available on this page after the meeting has taken place. Meeting papers will be published in a future issue of Philosophical Transactions B.

Attending this event

This is a residential conference, which allows for greater discussion and networking.

  • Free to attend
  • Advance registration essential
  • Catering and accommodation available to purchase during registration

Enquiries: contact the Scientific Programmes team.

Event organisers

Select an organiser for more information

Schedule of talks

11 February

09:00-12:30

Session 1: Evolutionary context of injury, illness and pain

5 talks Show detail Hide detail

Chairs

Dr Amanda Williams, University College London, UK

09:00-09:05 Welcome by the Royal Society and lead organiser

09:05-09:30 Evolutionary medicine and pain

Dr Randolph Nesse, Arizona State University, USA

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09:30-09:40 Discussion

09:40-10:05 Adaptive mechanisms contributing to maladaptive pain

Professor Edgar Terry Walters, University of Texas Health Science Center, USA

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10:05-10:15 Discussion

10:15-10:40 Sickness behaviours in insects: pro-inflammatory cytokines induce malaise and heightened nociception across phyla

Dr Shelley Adamo, Dalhousie University, Canada

Show speakers

10:40-10:50 Discussion

10:50-11:20 Coffee

11:20-11:45 Immune responses and pain in mammals

Dr Stephen McMahon, King’s College London, UK

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11:45-11:55 Discussion

11:55-12:20 Biology of nociception and pain in fish

Dr Lynne Sneddon, University of Liverpool, UK

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12:30-13:30

Lunch

13:30-17:00

Session 2: Conserved and convergent nociceptive mechanisms found in invertebrates

4 talks Show detail Hide detail

Chairs

Professor Edgar Terry Walters, University of Texas Health Science Center, USA

13:30-13:55 Adaptiveness of nociceptive sensitization mechanisms in molluscs

Dr Robyn Crook, San Francisco State University, USA

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13:55-14:05 Discussion

14:05-14:30 Using annelids to understand synaptic plasticity in nociceptive circuits

Professor Brian D Burrell, University of South Dakota, USA

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14:30-14:40 Discussion

14:40-15:10 Tea

15:10-15:35 Conserved molecular substrates of nociception in invertebrates and mammals

Dr Greg Neely, University of Sydney, Australia

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15:35-15:45 Discussion

15:45-16:10 Conserved nociceptive sensitization mechanisms in insects and mammals

Dr Michael Galko, University of Texas MDAnderson Cancer Center, USA

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16:10-16:20 Discussion

16:20-17:00 Poster session

12 February

09:00-12:30

Session 3: Evolutionary perspectives on pain-related mechanisms in mammals

5 talks Show detail Hide detail

Chairs

Dr Stephen McMahon, King’s College London, UK

09:00-09:05 Welcome by chair

09:05-09:30 Evolutionary adaptations of nociceptors in mammals

Dr Ewan St John Smith, University of Cambridge, UK

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09:30-09:40 Discussion

09:40-10:05 Primitive and recently evolved mechanisms driving persistent pain in mammals

Dr Theodore Price, University of Texas, USA

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10:05-10:15 Discussion

10:15-10:40 Epigenetics and mechanisms of chronic pain

Dr Sandrine Géranton, University College London, UK

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10:40-10:50 Discussion

10:50-11:20 Coffee

11:20-11:45 Emotional and cognitive processes related to chronic pain in mammals revealed by brain imaging

Dr Catherine Bushnell, National Institutes of Health, USA

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11:45-11:55 Discussion

11:55-12:20 Mice are people too: social modulation of and by pain in mice and undergraduates

Dr Jeffrey Mogil, McGill University, Canada

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12:20-12:30 Discussion

12:30-13:30

Lunch

13:30-17:00

Session 4: Evolutionary perspectives on cognitive and social aspects of pain

4 talks Show detail Hide detail

Chairs

Dr Catherine Bushnell, National Institutes of Health, USA

13:30-13:55 Pain communication behaviour in diverse mammals

Dr Matthew Leach, Newcastle University, UK

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13:55-14:05 Discussion

14:05-14:30 Tbc

14:30-14:40 Discussion

14:40-15:10 Tea

15:10-15:35 Clinical aspects of human pain in an evolutionary context

Dr Judith Kappesser, Giessen University, Germany

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15:35-15:45 Discussion

15:45-16:10 Persistence of pain and pain behaviour in humans and other animals

Dr Amanda Williams, University College London, UK

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16:10-16:20 Discussion

16:20-16:50 General discussion

Dr Amanda Williams, University College London, UK
Professor Edgar Terry Walters, University of Texas Health Science Center, USA

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16:50-17:00 Summary and closing remarks

Evolution of mechanisms and behaviour important for pain

Theo Murphy international scientific meeting organised by Dr Amanda Williams and Professor Edgar Terry Walters

Kavli Royal Society Centre, Chicheley Hall Newport Pagnell Buckinghamshire MK16 9JJ
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