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Memory reactivation: replaying events past, present and future

Scientific meeting

Location

Kavli Royal Society Centre, Chicheley Hall, Newport Pagnell, Buckinghamshire, MK16 9JJ

Overview

Theo Murphy international scientific meeting organised by Professor Edwin M Robertson and Dr Lisa Genzel.

The Royal Society at Chicheley Hall, home of the Kavli Royal Society International Centre

This meeting will directly address several key challenges to understanding replay and its contribution to memory. Participants will discuss the diverse contemporary ways of identifying memory replay, whether these are revealing identical, distinct or complementary processes, and finally, what contribution replay makes to circuits to support memory. Addressing these issues will be achieved through discussion prompted by short talks from speakers from diverse disciplines.

The schedule of talks and speaker biographies are below. Speaker abstracts will be available closer to the meeting. Recorded audio of the presentations will be available on this page after the meeting has taken place.

Poster session

There will be a poster session at 17:00 on Monday 20 May. If you would like to apply to present a poster please submit your proposed title, abstract (not more than 200 words and in third person), author list, name of the proposed presenter and institution to the Scientific Programmes team with the subject heading "Memory reactivation: poster abstract" no later than Friday 5 April 2019. 

Please note that places are limited and posters are selected at the scientific organisers' discretion. Poster abstracts will only be considered if the presenter is registered to attend the meeting.

Attending this event

This is a residential conference, which allows for increased discussion and networking.

  • Free to attend
  • Limited places
  • Advance registration is essential - request an invitation at the link above
  • Catering and accommodation available to purchase during registration

Enquiries: contact the Scientific Programmes team

Event organisers

Select an organiser for more information

Schedule of talks

20 May

09:00-11:00

Special session: what is replay/reactivations/reinstatements? And why?

2 talks Show detail Hide detail

Chairs

Dr Liset M de la Prida, Instituto Cajal - CSIC, Spain

09:05-09:45 Is memory reactivation a biologically plausible solution to catastrophic interference?

Professor Bruce L McNaughton, University of California at Irvine, USA

Show speakers

09:45-10:30 Integration of new information in memory: new insights from a complementary learning systems perspective

Dr James L McClelland, Stanford University, USA

Show speakers

10:30-11:00 Discussion

11:00-11:30 Coffee

11:30-12:30

Can we measure replay in functional MRI?

2 talks Show detail Hide detail

Chairs

Professor Bruce L McNaughton, University of California at Irvine, USA

11:30-11:50 Neural activity and information processing: a perspective from visual neuroscience

Dr Kendrick Kay, University of Minnesota, USA

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11:50-12:10 Measuring memory reactivation in humans

Dr Lila Davachi, Columbia University, USA

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12:10-12:30 Discussion

12:30-13:30

Lunch

13:30-14:30

Replay during task, rest and sleep: Same same but different?

2 talks Show detail Hide detail

Chairs

Dr James L McClelland, Stanford University, USA

13:30-13:50

13:50-14:10 Human fMRI and neural network modeling investigations of replay and consolidation during rest and sleep

Dr Anna Schapiro, Harvard Medical School, USA

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14:10-14:30 Discussion

14:30-15:00 Tea

15:00-16:00

Do spindles coordinate replay?

2 talks Show detail Hide detail

Chairs

Dr Liset M de la Prida, Instituto Cajal - CSIC, Spain

15:00-15:20 Sleep oscillations and brain plasticity: insights from in vivo dendritic calcium imaging

Dr Julie Seibt, University of Surrey, UK

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15:20-15:40 How the thalamus contributes to memory consolidation during sleep

Dr Adrien Peyrache, McGill University, Canada

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15:40-16:00 Discussion

16:00-17:00

Keynote talk

1 talk Show detail Hide detail

16:00-17:00 Factors determining neuronal order during hippocampal sharp-wave ripples

Dr Liset M de la Prida, Instituto Cajal - CSIC, Spain

Show speakers

17:00-18:00

Poster session

21 May

09:00-09:30

Special session: preplay or spontaneous organized activity?

3 talks Show detail Hide detail

Chairs

Professor Bruce L McNaughton, University of California at Irvine, USA

09:00-09:30

09:30-10:00 Generative predictive codes within the hippocampus

Dr George Dragoi, Yale University, USA

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10:00-10:30 Sharp wave ripples during memory-guided visual search in macaques

Dr Kari Hoffman, Vanderbilt University, USA

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10:30-11:00 Discussion

11:00-11:30 Coffee

11:30-12:30

Motor memory reactivation

2 talks Show detail Hide detail

Chairs

Professor Bruce L McNaughton, University of California at Irvine, USA

11:30-11:50 Role of slow oscillations and spindles on reactivation of task-related ensembles during sleep

Dr Karunesh Ganguly, University of California, San Francisco, USA

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11:50-12:10

12:10-12:30 Discussion

13:30-14:30

Scaling in sleep

2 talks Show detail Hide detail

Chairs

Dr Liset M de la Prida, Instituto Cajal - CSIC, Spain

13:30-13:50

13:50-14:10

14:10-14:30 Discussion

14:30-15:00 Tea

15:00-17:00

Replay and downscaling, do they interact?

3 talks Show detail Hide detail

Chairs

Dr James L McClelland, Stanford University, USA

15:00-15:20 Spiking in the cortex during wake and sleep

Dr Brendon Watson, University of Michigan, USA

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15:20-15:40 Experience and sleep-dependent synapse remodelling

Dr Guang Yang, Columbia University, USA

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15:40-16:00 Discussion

16:00-17:00 Summary

Memory reactivation: replaying events past, present and future

Theo Murphy international scientific meeting organised by Professor Edwin M Robertson and Dr Lisa Genzel.

Kavli Royal Society Centre, Chicheley Hall Newport Pagnell Buckinghamshire MK16 9JJ
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