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Mathematics education

‘A magic circle of circles’ by Benjamin Franklin, from a letter to John Canton, 29 May 1765 (Royal Society MS/597/2/21x)

The Royal Society would like all young people to have a positive experience of learning mathematics and quantitative skills, understanding its value and importance. However, in order to engage students there needs to be a strong supply of teachers who are well-qualified, well-trained and involved in career-long, subject-specific professional development.

The jobs landscape of 2030 will require people to be highly adept at data analysis and computational thinking (problem-solving using computer science techniques), and mathematics has been demonstrated to be one of the best ways to improve such skills. Without joined-up, evidence-informed, transparent and well-designed policy, the improvements in mathematics teaching that are needed will not be achieved.

It is critical that sufficient time is given to the development of any new curriculum and assessment arrangements and ongoing formative evaluation of developments needs to be in place to steer improvements.

Royal Society Advisory Committee on Mathematics Education

The Royal Society Advisory Committee on Mathematics Education (ACME) oversees the delivery of a programme of activities aligned with the Society’s education Vision for science, mathematics and computing education

The Royal Society's ACME held a mathematics conference 'Working together: Mathematics education in a changing landscape' in July 2018. It provided an opportunity to discuss current and emerging areas of mathematics education policy. 

Download conference report (PDF)

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