NeuroNavigation: how the brain represents the space we live in and finds our way around

John O'Keefe

Ferrier Lecture by Professor John O'Keefe FRS
 

Event Details

 
Learning about new environments or locating ourselves in familiar environments are some of the most fundamental tasks that the brain performs. Information is not stored in response to biological needs such as hunger or thirst but on the basis of cognitive motivations such as curiosity and a desire to map the unknown. There is a dedicated structure in the brain called the hippocampus at the centre of the cognitive mapping network which performs these tasks.

In this lecture Professor O’Keefe will describe the way in which the hippocampal formation carries out these operations, and in particular the different types of neuronal activities underpinning the senses of place, direction and distance which contribute to the creation of the cognitive map.
 
The Ferrier Lecture is given on a subject relating to the structure and function of the nervous system.  Professor John O'Keefe was presented this award for his pioneering work in cognitive neuroscience, especially on the role of the hippocampus, and the mechanisms supporting memory and cognition.
 
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NeuroNavigation: how the brain represents the space we live in and finds our way around 6-9 Carlton House Terrace London SW1Y 5AG UK

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  • Bioinspiration of new technologies 27 May 2015 at The Royal Society, London Scientific discussion meeting organised by Professor Denis Noble CBE FRS, Professor Clemens Kaminski and Professor Richard Templer
  • The next big thing 29 May 2015 at Hay Festival, Hay-on-Wye, Wales Four Royal Society Research Fellows discuss their work at the forefront of science at the Hay Festival.
  • Stuff matters 31 May 2015 at Hay Festival, Hay-on-Wye, Wales Join award winning author Mark Miodownik at the Hay Festival.

For more events please see the events diary.

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