When senses take flight: the evolution, development, mechanisms and function of avian senses

Theo Murphy international scientific meeting organised by Dr Hannah Rowland, Professor Innes Cuthill and Dr Tom Pike

Owl ear The unique hearing system of owls allows them to pinpoint the location of even the faintest sounds. Owl’s ears are asymmetrically positioned on the head. The difference in the height of the ears aids prey location because the sounds coming from prey are received by the ears at slightly different times. Image copyright Professor T Birkhead FRS.

Event details

Birds are adapted to a diverse range of habitats, and operate within a broad range of dietary niches. This diversity of life histories has resulted in an equally varied suite of adaptations for acquiring mates, finding food, avoiding predators and for navigation.  In this meeting, a distinguished list of international researchers encompassing avian vision, taste, olfaction, geo-magnetic sense, nociception (pain), tactile sense, and emotion, will be brought together to discuss new and emerging evidence of the evolution, development, mechanisms and function of avian senses.

You can download the draft meeting programme (PDF), and biographies and abstracts of the speakers are available below. Recorded audio of the presentations will be available on this page after the event.

Attending this event

This event has already taken place. Recorded audio of the presentations can be found below.

Enquiries: Contact the events team

When senses take flight: the evolution, development, mechanisms and function of avian senses

Organisers

Session 1: Introduction to bird sense

Session 2: Sensation

Session 3: Vision

Session 4: Taste and olfaction

Session 5: Olfactory navigation and geomagnetic sense

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