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Before, behind and beyond the discovery of the Higgs Boson

Event

Starts:

January
202014

09:00

Ends:

January
212014

17:00

Location

The Royal Society, London, 6-9 Carlton House Terrace, London, SW1Y 5AG

Overview

CMS Experiment at the LHC, CERN

Scientific discussion meeting organised by Professor John Ellis CBE FRS, Professor David Charlton and Professor Tejinder Virdee FRS

Event details

A new particle resembling the long-sought Higgs boson has been discovered at CERN. This meeting will discuss the genesis of this discovery, its interpretation, its significance, its relations to condensed-matter physics and cosmology, and possible future experiments to explore its nature.

Biographies of the organisers and speakers will be made available shortly, and you can download the draft two-day programme.  

Recorded audio of the presentations will be available on this page after the event and the papers will be published in a future issue of Philosophical Transactions A.

This meeting is immediately followed by a related satellite meeting at the Royal Society at Chicheley Hall, home of the Kavli Royal Society International Centre.

Attending this event

This event is intended for researchers in relevant fields and is free to attend. There are a limited number of places and registration is essential. An optional lunch is offered and should be booked during registration (all major credit cards accepted).

Enquiries: Contact the events team

Schedule of talks

Session 1

4 talks Show detail Hide detail

From condensed matter to the Standard Model of particle physics

Professor Luis Alvarez-Gaume, CERN, Switzerland

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Genesis of the LHC

Sir Chris Llewellyn-Smith FRS, University of Oxford, UK

Abstract

I will describe the scientific, technical and political genesis of the LHC. First, I will outline the history of the LHC, from first thoughts and the development of the accelerator experience that underwrote the LHC, through detailed studies of the physics potential and the LHC itself and the evolution of the experimental programme, to the presentation of the proposal to the CERN Council in December 1993. I will then discuss the events leading to the approval of construction in two stages (in December 1994) and later in a single stage (in December 1996), and the negotiations that brought non-Member States into the construction of the LHC in the intervening period.  After discussing the initial stages of construction, up to the point of no return, I will conclude by identifying points of potential relevance for the approval of possible future large projects.

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Spontaneous symmetry breaking in gauge theories

Professor Tom Kibble CBE FRS, Imperial College London, UK

Abstract

The aim of this historical talk is to describe the development of the idea of spontaneous symmetry breaking in gauge theories as I saw it from my perspective in Abdus Salam’s group at Imperial College.  I will give an account of particle physics in the years after the second world war, describe early attempts at constructing a unified theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions, the obstacles encountered and how they were eventually overcome with the mass-generating mechanism incorporating the idea of spontaneous symmetry breaking, one of whose features is the now-famous Higgs boson.

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The pre-LHC Higgs hunt

Professor Günther Dissertori, ETH Zurich, Switzerland

Abstract

Already before the start of the LHC, the search for the Higgs boson has been very intense. In this presentation I will summarize the main efforts, carried out over many years at the LEP and Tevatron colliders. The experiments at those colliders were able to constrain the possible mass range for the Higgs boson, either via direct searches, or indirectly via precision measurements and their sensitivity to quantum corrections.

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Session-2

4 talks Show detail Hide detail

Technical challenges of the LHC experiments

Professor Austin Ball, CERN, Switzerland

Abstract

This presentation will introduce the design of the general purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS, which jointly discovered the Higgs boson, showing how generic features are motivated by the characteristics needed to explore the physics landscape made accessible by the LHC accelerator, whose high collision rate creates a very challenging operating environment for instrumentation.   Some examples of the very different component designs chosen by the two experiment collaborations will then be highlighted, as an introduction to briefly describing the techniques used in the construction of these elements and subsequently in the assembly of both detection systems in their respective underground caverns.

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The Higgs discovery and measurements with ATLAS

Professor Fabiola Gianotti, CERN, Switzerland

Abstract

On 4 July 2012, the ATLAS and CMS experiments operating at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) announced the discovery of a new particle compatible with the Higgs boson (sought for almost
50 years), which is crucial for our understanding of fundamental physics and thus the structure and evolution of the universe.
This talk describes the unprecedented instruments and challenges that have allowed such an accomplishment, the results from the full recorded dataset, the physics and the relevance of this discovery, and the prospects from future detailed studies of this Higgs boson.

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The Higgs discovery and measurements with CMS

Professor Tejinder Virdee FRS, Imperial College London, UK

Abstract

On July 4th 2012 the CMS Collaboration announced the discovery of a Higgs boson, along with the ATLAS Collaboration. This talk will give brief details of the design and construction of CMS experiment. The boson’s discovery and recent results from the many CMS measurements of the properties of the boson using the full dataset from Run I of LHC will be presented. These will be compared with the predictions of the standard model of particle physics. The outlook will also be presented for making further measurements using much more data to be collected when the LHC restarts operation in 2015.

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The technical challenges of the LHC

Professor Paul Collier, CERN, Switzerland

Abstract

The LHC is a 27km circumference hadron collider, built at CERN to explore the energy frontier of particle physics. Approved in 1994, it was commissioned and began operation for data taking in 2010. The design and construction of the LHC presented many design, engineering and logistical challenges which involved pushing a number of technologies well beyond their level at the time.  Since the start-up of the machine, then there has been a very successful 3-year run with an impressive amount of data delivered to the LHC experiments.  With an increasingly large stored energy in the beam the operation of the machine itself presented many challenges and some of these will be discussed.  Finally, the planning for the next 20 years has been outlined with progressive upgrades of the machine, first to nominal energy, then to progressively higher collision rates.  The upgrades of the machine themselves represent a whole new set of design, engineering and operational challenges.  Some of the key areas for the upgrades will be explained in detail.

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Session-3

4 talks Show detail Hide detail

Beyond the standard Higgs

Professor Christophe Grojean, ICREA/IFAE, Barcelona, Spain

Abstract

An elementary, weakly coupled and solitary Higgs boson allows to extend the validity of the Standard Model up to very high energy, maybe as high as the Planck scale. Nonetheless, this scenario fails to fill the universe with Dark Matter and do not explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry. However, amending the Standard Model tends to destabilize the weak scale by  large quantum corrections to the Higgs potential. New degrees of freedom, new forces, new organizing principles are requested to provide a consistent and natural description of physics beyond the standard Higgs.

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Searches beyond supersymmetry

Professor David Charlton, University of Birmingham, UK

Abstract

The questions raised by the discovery of the light Higgs boson suggest new physics, and new particles, may be near to hand, at the energies now – and soon – being probed at the LHC. An extensive programme of searches for new particles is in place, exploring many possibilities. In the absence of definite predictions, the searches look at many and varied event types, hunting in numerous ways for deviations in the data from the background expectations from known processes.

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Multiple solutions in supersymmetry and the Higgs

Professor Ben Allanach, University of Cambridge, UK

Abstract

Searches for supersymmetric particles can be difficult to interpret. Here, we shall discuss the fact that, even given a well defined model of supersymmetry breaking with few parameters, there can be multiple solutions. These multiple solutions are physically different, and could potentially mean that points in parameter space have been ruled out by interpretations of LHC data when they shouldn't have been. We shall explain what such multiple solutions are, what they mean and why they haven't been discovered before. We shall illustrate their existence in the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, although we expect them to be present in other scenarios too.

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Searches for the supersymmetry

Professor Paris Sphicas, Athens/CERN, Greece

Abstract

With the discovery of a Higgs boson at the LHC, the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particles and their interactions is now on rock-solid ground, providing an unfailing and remarkably accurate description of experiments with and without high-energy accelerators.  With the physics of the very small thought to be understood at energy scales of at least 100 GeV, the situation is reminiscent of previous times in history when our knowledge of nature was deemed to be “complete”.  There are hints that this may once more not be so: from astrophysical observations to theoretical calculations of the Higgs sector, there are several indications that some physics “beyond the SM” should exist. To this day, Supersymmetry (SUSY) remains one of the most popular extensions to the SM.  A very significant effort has already been invested in searching for signs of the mirror world of particles hypothesized by SUSY, while the LHC experiments are currently carefully combing through their data samples looking for places where SUSY might be hiding. The talk will present a broad-brush picture of “the why, the what and the how” this search is carried out, along with the reasons for which the expectations are still so very high.

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Session-4

5 talks Show detail Hide detail

Closing discussion

Professor John Ellis CBE FRS, Kings College London, UK

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Future accelerators for Higgs studies

Professor Terry Wyatt FRS, University of Manchester, UK

Abstract

Beyond the LHC a number of possible future particle colliders have the potential to play an important role in measuring the properties of the already-discovered Higgs boson and/or searching for additional Higgs bosons. The prospects for the following future machines will be reviewed: circular or linear electron-positron, muon-antimuon, photon-photon, electron-proton, and very high energy hadron-hadron colliders.

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Higgs and cosmology

Professor Mikhail Shaposhnikov, EPFL, Switzerland

Abstract

I will discuss how the Higgs field of the Standard Model can make the Universe flat, homogeneous and isotropic; produce the quantum fluctuations seeding the structure formation; lead to the Hot Big Bang; and play the crucial role in baryogenesis and dark matter production.

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The upgraded ATLAS and CMS detectors and their physics capabilities I & II

Dr Oliver Buchmueller, Imperial College London, UK

Abstract

The unprecedented interaction rate at the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will require a significant overhaul of the Trigger, Data Acquisition and Computing strategy of the experiments. In this talk the planned strategies and upgrades for these critical components of the overall upgrade programme of the experiments are presented.  
 
In addition to performing precision studies of the properties of the newly discovered Higgs boson, the physics programme of the HL-LHC will also continue to search for New Physics beyond the standard model.  On the example of Supersymmetry and a few selected other BSM channels like the search for Dark Matter production in pp collisions, the reach of New Physics searches at the HL-LHC are illustrated.

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The upgraded ATLAS and CMS detectors and their physics capabilities I & II

Dr Pippa Wells, CERN, Switzerland

Abstract

The update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics from 2013 states that Europe’s top priority should be the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with a view to collecting ten times more data than in the initial design. The plans for upgrading the ATLAS and CMS detectors so as to maintain their performance with increasing luminosity are presented here.
 
A cornerstone of the physics programme is to measure the properties of the 125 GeV Higgs boson with the highest possible precision, to test its consistency with the Standard Model. The high-luminosity data will allow precise measurements of the dominant production and decay modes, and offer the possibility of observing rare modes including Higgs boson pair production. Direct and indirect searches for additional Higgs bosons beyond the Standard Model will also continue.

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Before, behind and beyond the discovery of the Higgs Boson The Royal Society, London 6-9 Carlton House Terrace London SW1Y 5AG UK