The Royal Society's response to the documentary 'The Great Global Warming Swindle'

09 March 2007

In response to the documentary 'The Great Global Warming Swindle', screened on Channel 4 on Thursday 8 March, Martin Rees, President of the Royal Society, said: "Global temperature is increasing. This warming threatens the future health and well-being of many millions of people throughout the world."

"This is especially true of those in the developing countries who are the least able to adapt and who are likely to be the worst affected. Many factors play a part in global warming but there is significant scientific evidence that greenhouse gas emissions, particularly CO2, are responsible for most of the temperature rise. If present trends continue the projected climate change will be far greater than that already experienced. Greenhouse gas emissions are something that we can and must take action on.

"Scientists will continue to monitor the global climate and the factors which influence it. It is important that all legitimate potential scientific explanations continue to be considered and investigated. Debate will continue, and the Royal Society has just hosted a two day discussion meeting attended by over 300 scientists, but it must not be at the expense of action. Those who promote fringe scientific views but ignore the weight of evidence are playing a dangerous game. They run the risk of diverting attention from what we can do to ensure the world's population has the best possible future."

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