Royal Society and NAS issue statement regarding the recent conviction of Italian earthquake scientists

25 October 2012

Sir Paul Nurse, President of the Royal Society, and Ralph J. Cicerone, President of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, have issued a joint statement regarding the recent conviction of Italian earthquake scientists.

Italian earthquake The village of Onna after the L'Ɓquila earthquake of April 2009

The case of six Italian scientists sentenced to be jailed for failing to warn of the L’Aquila earthquake in Italy in 2009 highlights the difficult task facing scientists in dealing with risk communication and uncertainty.

We deal with risks and uncertainty all the time in our daily lives.  Weather forecasts do not come with guarantees and despite the death tolls on our roads we continue to use bikes, cars, and buses.  We have also long built our homes and workplaces in areas known to have a history of earthquakes, floods, or volcanic activity.

Much as society and governments would like science to provide simple, clear-cut answers to the problems that we face, it is not always possible. Scientists can, however, gather all the available evidence and offer an analysis of the evidence in light of what they do know. The sensible course is to turn to expert scientists who can provide evidence and advice to the best of their knowledge. They will sometimes be wrong, but we must not allow the desire for perfection to be the enemy of good.

That is why we must protest the verdict in Italy. If it becomes a precedent in law, it could lead to a situation in which scientists will be afraid to give expert opinion for fear of prosecution or reprisal. Much government policy and many societal choices rely on good scientific advice and so we must cultivate an environment that allows scientists to contribute what they reasonably can, without being held responsible for forecasts or judgments that they cannot make with confidence.

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