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Research Fellows Directory

Christos Anastopoulos

Dr Christos Anastopoulos

Research Fellow

Organisation

University of Sheffield

Research summary

My research focuses on the understanding of fundamental particles and forces of nature, in particular the origin of mass. I played a crucial role to the analysis that led to the discovery of the Higgs boson at the LHC, for which The Nobel Prize in Physics 2013 was awarded.

The next step is a detailed study of its properties that will allow us to elucidate the generation of mass and probe the existence of new physics phenomena. The experimental determination of the exact nature of the newly discovered Higgs boson is currently the most crucial task in high energy physics. The exact properties of the Higgs boson need to be determined and its nature be precisely established, i.e whether it is the particle predicted by the SM or whether it has different properties signalling the appearance of new physics. It could very well turn out that the precision study of the Higgs boson is our best route to uncovering evidence of new physics. None of the above research endeavours can be sustained in the long term without a deep understanding of the detector performance. For this reason I contribute to the further development of the electron reconstruction and identification algorithms exploiting the full capabilities of the ATLAS detector.

Interests and expertise (Subject groups)

Grants awarded

Understanding the nature of Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

Scheme: University Research Fellowship

Dates: Oct 2015 - Sep 2020

Value: £413,879.31