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Research Fellows Directory

Laibing Jia

Dr Laibing Jia

Research Fellow

Organisation

University of Strathclyde

Research summary

Fish swimming in an aquarium might be one of the most enjoyable scenes. The high efficiency and low noise propulsive mechanism utilized by the locomotion of swimming animal attracts researchers' attention for many years. It offers a different paradigm of propulsion than manmade vehicles, and thus has particular application in the design of autonomous underwater vehicle and bio-mimetic robotic fish in ocean engineering and relevant applications. The swimming behaviour of aquatic animal in nature is a complex physical and biological problem which develops from a complicated forces balance between fish bodies’ internal forces and external fluid forces. The physical and biological mechanism involved in the fish swimming includes the contraction of fish muscle, the passive deformation of elastic body tissue along with the mutual interaction between the fish body and ambient fluid. While investigations on this subject are still mainly based on relatively simple models either ignoring the muscle contraction or specifying the body deformation by a given locomotion profile. The goal of this research is to advance the fundamental knowledge of biological fluid dynamics in animal swimming through a computational approach. We aims at a quantitative understanding of fundamental hydrodynamic mechanism associated with self-propelled swimmer considering the muscle contraction and coupled locomotion. The study helps to understand the physics underpinning complex biological flow mechanism. The research results can be used to provide valuable guidelines for biomimetic machine design by improving its efficiency to allow for longer missions to be undertaken. The study will lead to an advanced bio-mimic system with neuro -mechanical control feature, which have considerable value to the design capability and performance of biomimetic machine design which has particular applications in ocean and aerospace engineering.

Interests and expertise (Subject groups)

Grants awarded

A study of bio-fluid dynamics for fish swimming including muscle contraction and flexion effect

Scheme: Newton International Fellowships

Dates: May 2013 - May 2015

Value: £99,000