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Overview

Theo Murphy meeting organised by Professor Simon Cornish, Professor Michael Tarbutt and Dr Hannah Price. 

Ultracold molecules offer a new and fascinating system for the study of many aspects of quantum science including ultracold chemistry, quantum computing, metrology, quantum simulation and fundamental physics. Following rapid recent progress, this meeting will bring the community together to explore synergies with other disciplines and to map out the future avenues of research with ultracold molecules.

Attending this event

This meeting is intended for researchers in relevant fields. This will be a residential meeting held at Aubrey Park Hotel, Hemel Hempstead Road, Redbourn, St Albans, Hertfordshire, AL3 7AF. 

  • Free to attend
  • Limited places, advance registration essential
  • This is an in-person meeting only
  • Meals during the meeting can be paid for through Eventbrite (lunches on both days of the meeting and dinner on the first night)
  • Participants will need to book their own accommodation with Aubrey Park Hotel. 

Enquiries: contact the Scientific Programmes team.

Organisers

Schedule

09:00-09:05
Welcome by the lead organiser
09:05-09:30
Title of the talk will be available soon

Abstract

Abstract of the talk will be available soon.

09:30-09:45
Discussion
09:45-10:15
Title of the talk will be available soon.

Abstract

Abstract of the talk will be available soon.

10:15-10:30
Discussion
10:30-11:00
Break
11:00-11:30
Tunable itinerant spin dynamics with dipolar molecules

Abstract

Ultracold molecules enable exploration of exciting many-body physics due to their long-range, anisotropic dipolar interactions that govern dynamics in both internal and external degrees of freedom. Many scientific ideas based on this unique platform are now realizable due to recent experimental advances, including the production of quantum degenerate molecular gases, the shielding of inelastic collisions, the local state preparation and readout, and the precise tuning of a spin Hamiltonian. Annette Carroll will describe the recent study of tunable interactions between itinerant KRb molecules confined to 2D planes. At short times, the motion of the molecules is decoupled from the spin degree of freedom, and the spin dynamics are well-described by the mean field limit of the XXZ Hamiltonian. The mean field interaction, which shifts the rotational transition frequencies, was detected using Ramsey spectroscopy. The interaction’s strength and sign can be tuned with applied electric fields, as well as with the choice of rotational states. At longer times, elastic dipolar collisions, which couple the spin and motion, drive spin decoherence. This work paves the way for investigations of many-body spin-motion effects.

Speakers

11:30-11:45
Discussion
11:45-12:15
Title of the talk will be available soon.

Abstract

Abstract of the talk will be available soon.

Speakers

12:15-12:30
Discussion
12:30-13:30
Lunch

Chair

13:30-14:00
Title of the talk will be available soon.

Abstract

Abstract of the talk will be available soon.

Speakers

14:00-14:15
Discussion
14:15-14:45
Title of the talk will be available soon.

Abstract

Abstract of the talk will be available soon.

14:45-15:00
Discussion
15:00-15:30
Break
15:30-16:00
Creating a platform for all-magic hyperfine rotational states of biatomic molecules in optical tweezers

Abstract

Optical tweezers are convenient experimental tools to trap ultra-cold molecules, but their role in perturbing molecular internal states needs to be understood and managed. To preserve, for example, a superposition of states within the ground electronic state, optical tweezers must apply the same force to each of these states, a so-called magic condition. In molecular systems, magic conditions exist when the frequency of the tweezer light is tuned close to a transition energy between hyperfine resolved rovibrational levels of the ground and an excited electronic state. This is not always convenient as it can lead to unwanted scattering. This is especially crucial for our aim to create high-fidelity quantum logic gates. The studies of the authors of the talk show that efficient trapping of a molecule in an optical potential can be achieved by a selecting laser frequency that has a small detuning (on the order of tens of GHz) relative to an electric-dipole-forbidden molecular transition. Close proximity to this transition allows us to significantly modify the trapping potentials for multiple rotational states without sacrificing coherences among these states. In this talk, Professor Kotochigova will demonstrate that magic trapping conditions for multiple rotational states in several ultracold polar molecules can be created [1]. In addition, the author will show that successful tuning of the magic conditions can be achieved with an applied static electric field and the direction of the laser polarization as well as its ellipticity [2,3,4]. Finally, the author will discuss “unwanted” Raman and Rayleigh scattering in optical tweezers. These processes correspond to the off-resonant absorption of a tweezer photon by the molecule, promoting the molecule to an electronically excited state, followed by spontaneous emission of a photon into a bath mode. For Raman scattering, the initial and final molecular states are different. For Raleigh scattering, the spontaneously emitted photon only differs in direction from the absorbed laser photon and can only lead to dephasing, where the population among states remains unchanged. 

[1] Q. Guan, S. L. Cornish, and S. Kotochigova, Phys. Rev. A 103, 043311 (2021). 
[2] S. Kotochigova and D. DeMille, Phys. Rev A 82, 063421 (2010). 
[3] B. Neyenhuis, B. Yan, J. P. Covey, A. Chotia, A. Petrov, S. Kotochigova, J. Ye, and D. S. Jin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 230403 (2012). 
[3] A. Petrov, C. Makrides, and S. Kotochigova, Molec. Phys. 111, 1731-1737 (2013)

 

Speakers

16:00-16:15
Discussion
16:15-16:45
Title of the talk will be available soon.

Abstract

Abstract of the talk will be available soon.

 

16:45-17:00
Discussion
17:00-18:15
Poster session
09:00-09:30
Title of the talk will be available soon.

Abstract

Abstract of the talk will be available soon.

 

09:30-09:45
Discussion
09:45-10:15
Title of the talk will be available soon.

Abstract

Abstract of the talk will be available soon.

10:15-10:30
Discussion
10:30-11:00
Break
11:00-11:30
Quantum engineering of pair production process in spin models in multi- layers: from two- mode squeezing to topological Kitaev models

Abstract

Understanding and controlling the growth and propagation of quantum correlations and entanglement is an emerging frontier in non-equilibrium many-body physics, and a crucial key step for unlocking the full advantage of quantum systems. In this talk Professor Ana Maria Rey will discuss how in multi-layer spin systems, currently accessible in a broad range of quantum platforms, such as arrays of neutral atoms, Rydberg atoms, magnetic atoms and polar molecules, spin interactions can be utilized to realize in a controllable manner  a variety of correlated pair-production processes. In particular, the author will describe how in bi-layer systems, the capability to select individual layers and prepare targeted initial states, can enable the generation of iconic two-mode squeezing models that feature  exponential growth of entanglement and are relevant in many contexts  ranging  from the foundations of quantum mechanics, to parametric amplification in quantum optics, to the Schwinger effect in high energy physics and Unruh thermal radiation in general relativity. In multi-layers the author will show it is possible to engineer a chiral bosonic Kitaev model featuring chiral propagation of correlations. Overall in this talk Professor Ana Maria Rey will  report how current single layer addressing capabilities can allow shaping  and controlling the temporal growth and spatial propagation of quantum correlations in a variety of spin systems relevant for quantum simulation.  

 

Speakers

11:30-11:45
Discussion
11:45-12:15
Title of the talk will be available soon.

Abstract

Abstract of the talk will be available soon.

12:15-12:30
Discussion

Chair

13:30-14:00
Title of the talk will be available soon.

Abstract

Abstract of the talk will be available soon.

 

14:00-14:15
Discussion
14:15-14:45
Laser cooling of YO molecules to achieve high phase-space density

Abstract

Ultracold molecules are a promising platform for precision physics, quantum chemistry, quantum simulation, and quantum information studies. In the last decade, there has been a flurry of interesting activity in the direct laser cooling of molecules, down to temperatures of a few μK. Recently, an optical tweezer array of molecules has been demonstrated. However, owing to the low phase-space density (PSD) of laser cooled polar molecules loaded into conservative traps, collisions in a bulk sample have remained elusive so far, in contrast to ultracold bialkali molecules created via association. Our group is pursuing the goal of reaching quantum degeneracy of YO molecules. 
The PSD in conservative traps is limited largely by inefficient loading (few percent) due to large cloud sizes after sub-doppler cooling of molecules. In this talk, I will present our recent results on the first sub-Doppler magneto-optical trap (MOT) of YO molecules [1]. We observe volume compression by a factor of ~ 300 and temperature reduction by a factor of ~ 60 down to 30 μK in comparison to a conventional red detuned MOT, reaching a PSD several orders of magnitude higher than any previous molecular MOT. Currently, we are working on another cooling mechanism. YO has a low-lying excited state with a narrow transition linewidth of ~7 kHz. Optical photon scattering on this transition will result in cooling the molecules to recoil temperatures of 100s of nK. I will also present our progress so far on the narrow-line cooling of molecules.

[1] Burau et al. arXiv 2212.07472 (2022).

Speakers

14:45-15:00
Discussion
15:00-15:30
Break
15:30-16:00
Title of the talk will be available soon.

Abstract

Abstract of the talk will be available soon.

 

16:00-16:15
Discussion
16:15-17:00
Panel discussion/overview

Speakers