Multi-messenger Gravitational Lensing

11 - 12 March 2024 09:00 - 17:00 The Edwardian hotel Manchester Free
NASA

Theo Murphy meeting organised by Dr Federica Bianco, Professor Martin Hendry, and Professor Graham Smith.

The first multi-messenger (electromagnetic radiation and gravitational waves) detection of a gravitationally lensed cosmic explosion will have huge impact and unleash decades of novel science. This meeting brings together experts from the relevant disciplines to review recent progress and chart the path to first detection, as the Vera Rubin Observatory nears first-light, and gravitational wave detector sensitivity continues to improve. 

We particularly encourage the participation of early career researchers, including Masters thesis students, PhD students, postdocs, and research assistants. Everyone is welcome and encouraged to submit an abstract about their relevant work for a contributed talk or the poster session.

Meeting papers will be published in a future issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A

Contributed talks

We invite submission of abstracts (up to 200 words) to be selected for a contributed talk within the meeting. If successful, you will give a 12 minute presentation followed by 3 minutes for questions. Please submit your talk title and abstract to the Scientific Programmes team no later than Friday 26 January 2024. Your submission should include the text ‘Contributed abstract submission - Gravitational Lensing' in the email subject line.

Poster session

There will be a poster session on Monday 11 March. If you would like to present a poster, please submit your proposed title, abstract (up to 200 words), author list, and the name of the proposed presenter and institution to the Scientific Programmes team no later than Friday 26 January 2024. Please include the text 'Poster abstract submission - Gravitational Lensing' in the email subject line.

Programme

To view the programme and speakers' biographies, please scroll down and select the relevant day, then click the arrows to view the speakers and talks. 

Venue

This is a residential meeting taking place at The Edwardian hotel, Manchester, M2 5GP, UK. 

Attending this event

  • This is a residential meeting intended for researchers in relevant fields
  • Free to attend
  • Advance registration is essential (please request an invitation). When requesting an invitation, please briefly state your expertise and reasons for attending. Requests are reviewed by the meeting organisers on a rolling basis. You will receive a link to register if your request is successful
  • This is an in-person meeting only
  • Catering options are available to purchase during registration. Participants are responsible for their own accommodation booking 

Enquiries: contact the Scientific Programmes team.

Organisers

  • Federica Bianco

    Dr Federica Bianco, University of Delaware, USA

    Federica Bianco is an Associate Professor at the University of Delaware in the Departments of Physics and Astronomy and in the Biden School of Public Policy and Administration and a Resident Faculty in the University of Delaware Data Science Institute. She is Rubin Observatory Construction's Deputy Project Scientist and the chair of the Rubin LSST Transients and Variable Stars Science Collaboration. She works on data-driven solutions to problems that span from the nature of explosions in the sky to urban sustainability. She studies lightcurves, time series of light, in astronomy to understand stellar evolution and cosmology, and in the urban environment at the Urban Observatory, where the study of urban lightcurves enables sociological, ecologic, and economic inference. She is a TED 2019 fellow.

  • Martin Hendry

    Professor Martin Hendry, University of Glasgow, UK

    Martin Hendry is Professor of Gravitational Astrophysics and Cosmology at the University of Glasgow. His principal research interests are in gravitational lensing and gravitational-wave cosmology. He is a senior member of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC) and is currently a member of the LSC Management Team, chairing its Communications and Education Division. He also co-chairs the Galaxy Catalogs workstream of the LIGO Virgo KAGRA Cosmology Working Group. Martin is a Fellow of the Institute of Physics and the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

  • Graham Smith

    Professor Graham Smith, University of Birmingham, UK

    Graham Smith is Professor of Physics and Astronomy in the University of Birmingham's School of Physics and Astronomy. He led the first peer reviewed article on the gravitational lensing interpretation of LIGO's gravitational wave detections in 2018. He also led the study that demonstrates the feasibility of multi-messenger gravitational lensing in the mid-2020s. He is a founding member of the LSST:UK consortium through which UK scientists participate in the Rubin/LSST science collaborations, co-chairs Rubin/LSST's Strong Lensing Science Collaboration (SLSC), and leads the LSST:UK and SLSC contributions to Rubin commissioning.

Schedule

09:00-09:05 Welcome by the Royal Society and lead organiser
09:05-09:30 Introduction and overview of multi-messenger gravitational lensing
Professor Graham Smith, University of Birmingham, UK

Professor Graham Smith, University of Birmingham, UK

09:30-10:00 Fundamental physics with multi-messenger gravitational lensing
Dr Tessa Baker, Queen Mary University of London, UK

Dr Tessa Baker, Queen Mary University of London, UK

10:00-10:30 Time-delay cosmography: the present and the future

The arrival time delays of multiply imaged strong gravitationally lensed sources provide a one-step cosmological distance measurement. The methodology, known as time-delay cosmography, rose to prominence to provide precise measurements of the Hubble constant, independent of the local distance ladder and the cosmic microwave background. In this overview talk, Simon Birrer will introduce the methodology and key ingredients, as well as possible systematics. The author will then highlight the progress made in the last decade, present the recent results obtained, and present an outlook in the near future - which may well contain lensed gravitational waves.

Assistant Professor Simon Birrer, Stony Brook University, USA

Assistant Professor Simon Birrer, Stony Brook University, USA

10:30-11:00 Break
11:00-11:30 Probing kilonova physics with multi-messenger gravitational lensing
Dr Christine Collins, GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Germany

Dr Christine Collins, GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Germany

11:30-12:00 Contributed talks
12:00-12:30 Discussion

Chair

Nial Tanvir

Professor Nial Tanvir, University of Leicester, UK

13:30-14:00 Towards the first detection: the gravitational wave perspective

Abstract of the talk will be available soon. 

Dr Otto Akseli Hannuksela, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Dr Otto Akseli Hannuksela, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

14:00-14:30 Towards the first detection: the electromagnetic perspective

Abstract of the talk will be available soon. 

Dr Matt Nicholl, Queen’s University Belfast, UK

Dr Matt Nicholl, Queen’s University Belfast, UK

14:30-15:00 Towards the first detection: combining the messengers
Dr Anupreeta More, Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, India

Dr Anupreeta More, Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, India

15:00-15:30 Break
15:30-16:00 Lessons from multi-messenger astronomy and GW170817

Abstract of the talk will be available soon. 

Dr Igor Andreoni, University of Maryland and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, USA

Dr Igor Andreoni, University of Maryland and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, USA

16:00-16:30 Gravitationally Lensed Supernovae: lessons learned

We have finally started to discover gravitationally lensed, multiply-imaged, supernova explosions. Exploiting the “standard candle” nature of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), used to discover and study the accelerated expansion of the Universe, strongly lensed SNe Ia can be located in time-domain wide-field surveys, even with poor spatial resolution, ie, without resolving the multiple images. These systems can then be followed-up from space or using adaptive optics imaging. A different route of lensed SN discoveries is the monitoring of massive clusters with space instruments. 

The talk will focus on the successes and shortcomings of ongoing ground-based shallow surveys in finding galaxy-lensed SNe, aiming at developing efficient strategies for lensed transient cosmography in the LSST era.

Professor Ariel Goobar, Stockholm University, Sweden

Professor Ariel Goobar, Stockholm University, Sweden

16:30-17:00 Discussion
17:00-18:30 Flash talks and poster session

Chair

Anupreeta More

Dr Anupreeta More, Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, India

09:00-09:30 False positives: the gravitational wave perspective

Abstract of the talk will be available soon. 

Dr David Keitel,  University of the Balearic Islands, Spain

Dr David Keitel, University of the Balearic Islands, Spain

09:30-10:00 False positives: the electromagnetic perspective
Samanatha Oates, Lancaster University, UK

Samanatha Oates, Lancaster University, UK

10:00-10:30 Insights from population synthesis
10:30-11:00 Break
11:00-11:30 Machine learning methods for multi-messenger gravitational lensing
Dr Niharika Sravan, Drexel University, USA

Dr Niharika Sravan, Drexel University, USA

11:30-12:00 Contributed talks
12:00-12:30 Discussion

Chair

Martin Hendry

Professor Martin Hendry, University of Glasgow, UK

13:30-14:00 Lensing in gamma-ray bursts

Lensed gamma-ray bursts offer several key advantages over other lensed sources. In particular, their short duration enables precision timing of the lens to a degree not possible with quasars or even supernovae, and their short duration can plausibly probe comparably short delay times. There are now samples of ~10,000 GRBs which can be searched for lensing signals. However, most of these are poorly localised on the sky, so the actual lens cannot be identified. The search is then for identical GRBs with overlapping sky localisations but offsets in time. Several plausible examples have been found, but none are entirely compelling. In this talk, the author will review past searches for lensed GRBs and consider how to optimise future searches to improve the chances of robust discoveries. 

Professor Andrew Levan, Radboud University, The Netherlands

Professor Andrew Levan, Radboud University, The Netherlands

14:00-14:30 FRBs and the radio perspective on multi-messenger gravitational lensing

Abstract of the talk will be available soon. 

Inés Pastor-Marazuela, University of Manchester, UK

Inés Pastor-Marazuela, University of Manchester, UK

14:30-15:00 Contributed talks
15:00-15:30 Break
15:30-16:00 Synergies with the Vera C. Rubin Observatory

Abstract of the talk will be available soon. 

Dr Federica Bianco, University of Delaware, USA

Dr Federica Bianco, University of Delaware, USA

16:00-17:00 Panel discussion
Professor Nial Tanvir, University of Leicester, UK

Professor Nial Tanvir, University of Leicester, UK

Professor Martin Hendry, University of Glasgow, UK

Professor Martin Hendry, University of Glasgow, UK

Dr Anupreeta More, Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, India

Dr Anupreeta More, Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, India