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How the Society is thinking about Research Culture?

The Royal Society’s research culture programme aims to embed a culture of research that will support the science community and the scientific endeavour looking forward to 2035. However, the Society is not just thinking about research culture across the broader research landscape, there is also continual reflection on how to improve practice through all of the things that we do.

Recognition and esteem – how we are trying to broaden recognition

  • Grants (and Medals? – Polly to check) committee members all received unconscious bias training prior to reviewing applications. There is also clear guidance to committee members about not only looking at publications, but considering the researcher in the round (Grants team to check)
  • Grant Fellows (URF and DHF) receive grants of 5 years, with the opportunity to extend for a further three. This allows the award holders to follow curiosity driven research. They also receive additional funding to run public engagement activities and are given the opportunity to take part in policy work and take apply for work experience in Government.
  • All grant applicants and lead authors in our journals are required to have an ORCID ID, helping to track the range of activities they are undertaking. The Society was the first publisher to make this mandatory for all lead authors (Stuart to check)
  • The Society is a signatory of DORA. – more text to add
  • Society launches evidence synthesis work including proposals on how to improve recognition of this activity. Journals launched evidence synthesis article type in three journals 2018
  • All our journals use Publons which allows researchers to gain credit for their peer review work in an open and validated system

Recognition and esteem – how we are trying to broaden recognition

  • Grants (and Medals? – Polly to check) committee members all received unconscious bias training prior to reviewing applications. There is also clear guidance to committee members about not only looking at publications, but considering the researcher in the round (Grants team to check)
  • Grant Fellows (URF and DHF) receive grants of 5 years, with the opportunity to extend for a further three. This allows the award holders to follow curiosity driven research. They also receive additional funding to run public engagement activities and are given the opportunity to take part in policy work and take apply for work experience in Government.
  • All grant applicants and lead authors are required to have an ORCID ID, helping to track the range of activities they are undertaking. The Society was the first publisher to make this mandatory for all lead authors (Stuart to check)
  • The Society is a signatory of DORA. – more text to add
  • Society launches evidence synthesis work including recommendations on how to improve recognition of this activity. Journals launched of evidence synthesis article type in three journals 2018

Setting culture – what are we doing to lead culture

  • The Society has recently published statements on research integrity and reproducibility, outlining the roles and responsibilities of individuals and institutions.
  • Science+ meetings allow researchers from across the research landscape to explore different issues with a slightly broader topic scope. Childcare bursaries are also offered to attendees of these meetings – Scientific programmes to check
  • The Society has produced animations and guidance on unconscious bias to ensure that all those who serve on selection panels are aware of differences in how candidates may present themselves, how to recognise bias in oneself and others, how to recognise inappropriate advocacy or unreasoned judgement.
  • The Society has produced an animation and guidance on group decision-making, with the aim of alerting Royal Society committee chairs and panel members to consider that by pooling diverse information and different areas of expertise, groups can make better decisions than individuals

A culture of mobility – how we support mobility and people doing different careers

  • The Society has produced a series of case studies on the different ways that individuals can achieve success, these include Where will your career take you?, Parent Carer Scientist celebrates the diversity of work life patterns of 150 scientists across the UK with the aim of increasing the visibility of people combining a career in science with a family life, Inspiring Scientists records the life stories of 10 scientists with minority ethnic heritage. Industry case studies
  • The Society encourage collaboration and relationship building through the Industry Fellowship and Entrepreneur in residence programmes. Industry to check
  • Do we offer other training opportunities that support mobility?/?
  • Something on Commonwealth Science work – mobility, networks, collaboration

Open science – how we are encouraging open science

Fostering leadership

  • The Society’s annual diversity conference explores issues and trends affecting diversity in STEM.
  • Something on us highlighting different leaders through history of science work
  • Something about developing ECRs to become future leaders through training offered – grants and public engagement
  • Something about career tracker, history of developing senior leaders.

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